Homeland security

Citizen-Driven Recovery: Interview with Jane Cage

Inside Homeland Security, Summer 2013. This content cannot be reproduced without permission of IHS.
Jane Cage, Chair of the Citizens Advisory Recovery Team. Ed Peaco/For Inside Homeland Security

Jane Cage, Chair of the Citizens Advisory Recovery Team. Ed Peaco/For Inside Homeland Security

On the morning after the strike of a massive EF-5 tornado, Jane Cage of Joplin, Missouri, helped clear debris and board up windows at a friend’s house. Then they headed to another side of town to help church members who had a downed tree blocking their garage door.

“When we headed in that direction, I got my first real look at the incredible devastation,” Ms. Cage said. “I will never forget driving down Joplin Street in the pouring rain with debris everywhere I looked. By the time we got close to the high school where the couple lived, we started to get lost. I got a sick, almost panicked feeling as we looked around.”

The tornado of May 22, 2011, left 161 people dead and approximately 1,000 others injured …

Within a few weeks, she stepped forth to lead the Citizens Advisory Recovery Team (CART), a group that would gather the full spectrum of residents to decide what Joplin would become.

For the groundswell of citizen response that led to a comprehensive redevelopment plan, in December 2012 Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano honored Ms. Cage and the people of Joplin with the first Rick Rescorla National Award for Resilience. … The honor commemorates Rescorla’s work on 9/11, when he led an evacuation of 2,700 Morgan Stanley employees from the South Tower of the World Trade Center, saving the lives of many of his coworkers but losing his own. … Link to the full article

National Defense University: Developing future leaders

Inside Homeland Security, Fall 2013. This content cannot be reproduced without permission of IHS.
Major General Gregg F. Martin / NDU

Major General Gregg F. Martin / NDU

“The biggest advantage of the United States and our allies is our people—their thinking, their ideas, their character. We need to figure out how to advance it, leverage it, and make it even better. It is a huge pillar of our future security.” — Major General Gregg F. Martin, NDU President

An IHS trip to the NDU campus in Washington, D.C., yielded more than a dozen articles profiling educators and staff officials. Link to a section of this package.

Homeland Security Investigations makes
child exploitation a core priority

Inside Homeland Security, Summer 2013. This content cannot be reproduced without permission of IHS.

Special agents of the Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) directorate of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) are reaching across the globe and through cyberspace to crack down on child exploitation in all its forms. In physical and digital realms, these crimes have become international in scope and without boundaries. … ICE’s unique investigative and enforcement authorities are well suited to the nature of child-exploitation crimes, combining customs and immigration law and exercising a global reach. Link to the full article

Los Angeles County Sheriff building
trust with Muslim community

“When we first started, seeing a police car or a sheriff’s car driving up to a mosque was a sign of trouble,” Sergeant Abdeen said. During his initial encounters, the Muslim community greeted him with suspicion; some people thought he was trying to collect intelligence. “They looked at me as a law enforcement officer, even though I was Muslim and spoke the language and was comfortable in the mosque environment.”

However, Sergeant Abdeen continued to meet people, and he developed educational and youth-oriented programs to demonstrate goodwill. Over time, the sheriff’s department held town hall meetings in the Muslim community on topics from driver’s education for teens and identity theft avoidance, to terrorism and violent extremism. Link to the full article.

 

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