Improving Federal Veterinarian Capacity: A Vital Issue in U.S. Homeland Security

A peer-reviewed article by Joel C. Spangenberg
A term member of the Council on Foreign Relations, and former Navy surface warfare officer (nuclear) and subcommittee deputy staff director on the U.S. Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs
Edited by Ed Peaco
Published in the online journal Inside Homeland Security, Summer 2014
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Despite the presence or promise of funding in the past, it has not been enough to identify, address, and fix root cause issues facing the Federal veterinary workforce. Fortunately luck has been on the nation’s side in that it has not had to face a major animal disease outbreak of the scale envisioned by experts or experienced by the U.K. This luck could run out at any moment. This leaves only willpower, armed with greater data and insight, as the prime motivator to make the changes that will prevent or at the very least mitigate the impact of animal disease outbreaks and other related threats to the homeland.

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Mitigating the Risk of Gun Violence through the Use of Technology

A peer-reviewed article by Marie Wright
Professor of Management Information Systems at Western Connecticut State University
Edited by Ed Peaco
Published in the online journal Inside Homeland Security, Summer 2014
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… In the aftermath of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting, the technologies necessary to make smart guns have received renewed attention. On March 14, 2013, leaders in the technology investment community announced new funding initiatives to reduce gun violence with technology. A group of more than twenty Silicon Valley venture capitalists announced plans to work with the Sandy Hook Promise Technology Committee to Reduce Gun Violence. … Smart guns might not prevent all gun violence, but they could decrease the number of mass shootings, as well as lower the number of youth suicides, accidental shootings, and deaths from stolen weapons. The use of safety enhancing technologies is an important step toward making guns more secure, and lessening the risk of gun violence.

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Symphony to play uplifting modern piece

Published in the Springfield (Mo.) News-Leader, Oct. 1o, 2014
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A new generation of classical composers has awakened to the fact that if they want their work to be heard, they have to write things that people want to hear, Springfield Symphony Director Kyle Wylie Pickett said.

Leaving behind the dissonance and austerity of the modern era, these contemporary composers have rediscovered beauty and are creating appealing and exciting works. …

For these reasons, Pickett said he encourages symphony patrons to reassess how they feel about modern music: “When you see a new piece in the concert season, that’s not the one to avoid; that’s the one you want to hear.”

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Jazz festival: Channel of knowledge keeps music alive

Published in the Springfield (Mo.) News-Leader, Oct. 3, 2014
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Arthur Duncan. Photo credit: Ed Peaco

When [Arthur] Duncan was a youngster, [Dallas] Bartley was middle aged, having traveled nationally as the bassist for jump-blues innovator Louis Jordan and his Tympany Five and then living and teaching in Springfield. Through Bartley and others, Duncan learned the basics of jazz.

Dallas Bartley. MSU archives

Dallas Bartley. MSU archives

“Like he used to tell me, it’s not how many notes you play, it’s what you play. You play it with taste, and I kept wondering what he meant by that, being young,” Duncan said.

While learning his instrument, Duncan wondered how musicians like Bartley made it look so easy. Duncan said a musician in St. Louis gave him an answer: It was a matter of seasoning, of playing in a dedicated way over a long time.

Meanwhile, Duncan tapped into another channel of jazz awareness at Drury University, which exposed him to national figures such as Stan Kenton.

Duncan kept playing. He and his trio mates — drummer Richard Allen and bassist Ernie Bedell (nephew of Dave Bedell, who was one of Duncan’s mentors) — have been playing together for more than 30 years. They know each other’s moves and how to follow each other, how to interact and counteract.

“When I was younger — yes, I had some talent. When I got older, I knew what I had to do with it. It took me a while to figure that out,” Duncan said. “Now, everything fits. It’s easier for us to come together and put it together.”

Over the years, following in Bartley’s footsteps, Duncan has worked with young pianists and in schools, particularly with rhythm sections, he said.

“He told me to keep jazz alive,” Duncan said. “He told me, ‘One day you’re going be our age,’ and he told me to pass it on. That’s what I remember, passing it on to the younger ones.”

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Music, aroma of roasting pig will infuse Oldfield’s air

Published in the Springfield (Mo.) News-Leader, Sept. 26, 2014
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For roughly two decades, on the last Saturday of September, the Oldfield Opry has put on a day of music while serving roast pork.

Other than a few tweaks in the lineup of bands, the event will proceed as always, said Eddie Goins, an organizer with the venerable and friendly institution of traditional music, fellowship and corny humor.

Because the fragrance of meat cooking may not carry all the way to Springfield, willpower may be necessary on Saturday to start the 25-mile jaunt to Oldfield at the junction of Missouri highways 125 and T.

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Learn primitive skills, ways of the pioneers at Hulston Mill gathering

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A bow-and-arrow workshop and competition are planned at the Bois D’Arc Primitive Skills Camp & Knap-In. Bo Brown demonstrates a bow made in the wildnerness way. Ed Peaco/For the News-Leader

Published in the Springfield (Mo.) News-Leader, Sept. 24, 2014
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Don Brink blows into a tinder bundle to fan flames he produced with sticks and string. Ed Peaco/For the News-Leader

Starting a fire with sticks probably was blasé for people living 100,000 years ago and more, but it can feel like a spectacular breakthrough for people who master the timeless skill today.

“You wouldn’t believe the hoots and hollers when they get it,” said Bo Brown, friction-fire instructor and one of the organizers of the Bois D’Arc Primitive Skills Camp & Knap-In.

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Violin concerto brings drama to Springfield Symphony

Published in the Springfield (Mo.) News-Leader, Sept. 19, 2014
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Chee-Yung

Rhythmic change-ups, stunning solo flights and mood fluctuations — romantic to brooding to dancing — keep the ears at attention throughout the Prokofiev piece. …

Those who caught the Springfield-Drury Civic Orchestra’s performance last week of the Grieg Piano Concerto heard the elegant dialogue between solo piano and the full orchestra. Prokofiev takes a different approach in the second movement of his concerto with interplay between the soloist and small groupings from the orchestra.

“It’s a very cool concerto,” Chee-Yun said. “Playing with the orchestra is almost like playing chamber music with different instruments on stage.”

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Home of the Week: Ken and Mimi Grozinger

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The Grozingers’ water gardens have grown to cover most of the yard. Ed Peaco/For the News-Leader

Published in the Springfield (Mo.) News-Leader, Sept. 14, 2014
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Photos by Ed Peaco

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Mimi says creating the water garden was something that appealed to each of them on different levels. "It's very addictive. He got into the fish and I got into the plants and we just kept going," she says. ed Peaco/For the News-Leader

Mimi says creating the water garden was something that appealed to each of them on different levels. “It’s very addictive. He got into the fish and I got into the plants and we just kept going,” she says. Ed Peaco/For the News-Leader

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Civic orchestra to open 10th season

Published in the Springfield (Mo.) News-Leader, Sept. 12, 2014
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Anthony Padilla

Even during the most forceful keyboard cascades, Edvard Grieg’s Piano Concerto in A minor feels more generous than daunting, and the piece is enriched with hints of Norwegian folk songs. It’s not the Norway portrayed in the pent-up paranoia of Munch’s painting or the cold and repressed characters of Ibsen.

“I get a lot of exciting, enthralling, exuberant spirit in this concerto, as well as extremely dramatic intensity,” [featured soloist Anthony] Padilla said.

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Blues people pull together for festival

Published in the Springfield (Mo.) News-Leader, Sept. 5, 2014
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John Németh

[John] Németh, known for his hard-driving harmonica sound, came upon the instrument more than 20 years ago when he was shopping for an electric keyboard. As the peripherals mounted up — stand, cords, seat, amp, foot pedal — the price tag approached $3,000.

“But then I saw the harmonica in a case for six bucks, and I said to myself, ‘Hey, I’ll take that harmonica,’ ” he said — and a top-notch Marine Band harmonica at that.

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